Journalism faces an 'existential crisis' in Trump era

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This topic contains 14 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Mike LaRoche Mike LaRoche 1 month, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #1231

    EThompson
    Participant

    CNN correspondent Christiane Amanpour has been awarded the Committee to Project Journalists’ Burton Benjamin Memorial Award for “extraordinary and sustained achievement in the cause of press freedom.”

    This is a portion of her remarks that left me speechless and I choose to publish it on one of America’s most important holidays:

    “The winning candidate did a savvy end run around us and used it to go straight to the people.”

    What a blasphemous idea! I hope Hannity & Co play this one over and over again because I’d like to bury this woman’s career once and for all.

  • #1232
    MLH
    MLH
    Moderator

    “straight to the people” indeed!

  • #1233
    Administrator
    Administrator
    Keymaster

    She is commonly cited as some sort of fair, world-class figure, which I find depressing. This Right-baiting, Jew-hating, Helen Thomas 2.0 should not be regarded well anywhere outside of a mosque or a terrorist headquarters. Some overlap there, I see.

  • #1239
    Mike LaRoche
    Mike LaRoche
    Participant

    Andrea Peyser had the right of it years ago when she referred to Christiane Amanpour as a “CNN war slut” and a “Palestinian propagandist.”

    • #1242
      Administrator
      Administrator
      Keymaster

      Heh.

    • #1243

      EThompson
      Participant

      After my initial exuberance on election night, I am now genuinely afraid that our pragmatic and highly efficient President-elect will be unusually distracted and harassed by the MSM. It’s been a ‘hobby’ whining and complaining about the liberal press, but I now believe it has truly earned the label of a fascist and obstructionist monster, the very label it has used to describe Trump.

      I believe Donald is the toughest of the tough but there is so much that has to be fixed so quickly and I am worried about the magnitude of the forces pitted against him (even among the GOP).

      I also worry about the pressure of putting Trump International into a blind trust without his most accomplished advisers (his kids) running a company that provides hundreds of thousands of jobs across the planet.

      This is truly a “do or die” moment for our country and if anyone on this site can assuage my fears, I’d be grateful.

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by  EThompson.
      • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by  EThompson.
  • #1246
    MLH
    MLH
    Moderator

    It did take the left a couple of decades to get us where we are. . . (that doesn’t help, does it?)

    • #1247

      EThompson
      Participant

      The Saul Alinsky acolytes did an extremely thorough job and unfortunately, the pragmatists and the capitalists do not have the luxury of two decades to fix it.

      $20 trillion dollar debts can’t wait that long.

  • #1248
    MLH
    MLH
    Moderator

    Debt or deficit? My [probably poor] understanding is that if we clear up one of these, and I can’t remember which, the whole monetary system will fall apart because the system works on fiat money and interest.

    • #1249

      EThompson
      Participant

      It’s debt which means taxpayers are spending hard-earned dollars paying off interest rates that have been distorted due to currency manipulation. It also means that the countries we are borrowing from (China in particular) have enormous control over our trade and national security policies.

  • #1250
    MLH
    MLH
    Moderator

    What about the monetary system collapse part?

  • #1251

    EThompson
    Participant

    Good point and I’ll quote an economic adviser with whom I agree:

    “Think of how the world is changing. Since the 2008 stock market crash, asset prices were buoyed by easy money from the Federal Reserve. Stock markets soared as investors regained their confidence. But that confidence came at a steep price.
    The Federal Reserve spent more than $4.0 trillion preventing both a stock market crash and the U.S. dollar collapse. Unfortunately, quantitative easing wasn’t meant to last forever.
    The Fed finally wound down their bond buying program last year, injecting a strain of worry into stock markets. We’ve seen that strain grow into a full-fledged panic this year, with markets gyrating wildly through the summer.
    Why are they panicking? Well, the short answer is that monetary stimulus is nearly at an end.”

    The economic mess will have to be cleaned up and there will be an Armageddon by the end of this year, particularly as the Fed Reserve has pretty much promised to raise interest rates. (I don’t disagree with this because zero interest rates discourage savings; an activity of which I am growing increasingly fond.)

    I think this country is going to undergo a severe depression sooner rather than later although the Donald will try to ease the pain with various infrastructure refurbishing bills. In any case, I am easing my way out of the market for now starting with non-dividend ‘growth’ stocks.

    Cash is King.

  • #1292
    Devereaux
    Devereaux
    Participant

    Interesting commentary here.

    Liz, you are referring to what my friend Jerry Spencer and I call “the Math Party”. That is, the math will undo this sooner or later, like it or not. We cannot ccntinue to spend like there is no end to the money, and we won’t. The single thing that keeps us afloat is that we are the reserve currency of the world. But the British pound sterling was once. And the math + human nature says there is no will to change anything until there is no ability to change anything – and then it all comes to a halt.

    There is little probable reason to think that we will be displaced as the reserve currency – in the short term. As my friend Jerry would say, “We are the best looking horse in the glue factory.” But circumstances change. And if they do, we will be in a world of hurt. Being replaced as the reserve currency will suddenly cause this whole house of cards to fall. All that will be left is hard assets – land, crops, objects (like alcohol, ammunition, guns, foodstuffs).

    With it will be a cession of all government spending – good or bad. Social security will cease, a bad as that money which we by force gave to the government would be worth so much more had we invested it on our own. And no government deficiets. But then the pols couldn’t play.

  • #1293

    EThompson
    Participant

    “Social security will cease, a bad as that money which we by force gave to the government would be worth so much more had we invested it on our own.”

    Couldn’t believe the uproar that ensued when George W. meekly suggested allowing individuals to re-direct a mere 2% of their medicare budget into private accounts.

    And that it is exactly what infuriates me most, not to mention that medicare requires very expensive supplements which still isn’t enough and requires HSAs as well.

    My husband and I are healthy which also explains my hostility to the idea of coverage with pre-existing conditions. Guess I should have waited to buy premiums until one of us gets seriously ill. Silly me; we have carried personal health insurance since we became independent operators and my parents were not funding the bill until I was 26!

  • #1302
    Mike LaRoche
    Mike LaRoche
    Participant

    “The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people’s money.” — Margaret Thatcher

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